Module Eight

If Trees Could Talk Modules

Living in a Global Forest

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OVERVIEW

Living in a Global Forest has students compare the ecological footprint of a home constructed in 1950 with one constructed in 2000. Students will learn where our wood comes from now and will analyze global efforts to manage the world's forests.

OBJECTIVE

History
  • The student understands economic patterns since 1968.
    (Era 10, Contemporary United States; Standard 2)
Social Studies
  • The student will describe and explain the relationships between national sovereignty and global interests in matters of natural resources, trade, use of technology, and welfare of people.
    (Standard 9, Global Connections)
  • The student will propose, compare, and evaluate alternative uses of land and resources in communities, regions, nations, and the world.
    (Standard 3, People, Places, Environment)

STATE STANDARDS

LESSON PLAN

OVERVIEW

Teacher Preparation:

Download and Print: Module 8, one Teacher copy & one copy per student of the Student Pages PDFs using Adobe Acrobat.

DAY ONE
DAY TWO
DAY THREE
DAY FOUR
DAY FIVE

Class Extensions

Conduct a global summit in which students from area schools meet to discuss problems and potential solutions concerning the forests of the world. Each school should represent a different country so that when students come together for the summit, they will gain a global perspective.

Arrange a field trip to a forest products company or invite a guest speaker from a local forest products company to talk with your students about topics such as the importing and exporting of wood, the various uses for forest products, and timber harvesting.

Have students measure their ecological footprint using a site such as Earth Day Network. Ask students to share their results with the class and discuss the potential implications of their findings on the global forest.

Team